My Path as a Techie to Learning About Equity

My Path as a Techie to Learning About Equity

Electrical Engineer, Jonathan Rotner, discusses the stories that stayed with him from his research for a website and paper called “AI Fails and How We Can Learn from Them”. He recalls a couple of stories where his first reaction was the AI fails were engineering problems that could be analyzed and fixed, when they were issues of Equity.

Safeguarding Our Smart Ports: Lessons from Djibouti with Tamara Ambrosio-Hemphill

Safeguarding Our Smart Ports: Lessons from Djibouti with Tamara Ambrosio-Hemphill

In this episode of the Knowledge-Driven Podcast, MITRE’s Tamara Ambrosio-Hemphill guides us through the decision-support tools MITRE has been developing to help the U.S. safeguard critical infrastructure across the globe while building partnerships and helping allies create a better future for their citizens.

Pivoting From In-Person to Virtual Transformation When That’s the Only Option

Pivoting From In-Person to Virtual Transformation When That’s the Only Option

The pace of change accelerated across organizations over the past year, perhaps even more so across the government, given the previously limited telework capacity and available resources for robust virtual collaboration. This post focuses on lessons learned while taking a high-engagement, in-person, transformational change method into the virtual world to support the Census Bureau’s effort to design a 21st-century organization.

March Aviation Industry Update, with Michael Wells and Bob Brents

March Aviation Industry Update, with Michael Wells and Bob Brents

Air travel has become so common place to the point where many of us never even think about the wonder of flying on an aircraft or being able to send things around the world over night. And yet every day, countless agencies and individuals around the world move in a coordinated ballet even in the face of a global pandemic. In this session of the tri-annual Aviation Industry Update podcast, Michael Wells and Bob Brents focus on the complex logistics involved with distributing COVID vaccines across the country as well as the various applications that can help ease travel restrictions for a public eager to get back to normal.

The Power of Geospatial Data In Developing Countries

The Power of Geospatial Data In Developing Countries

Many countries in the Global South are not fortunate enough to have the infrastructure or tools that we take for granted. Things as simple as knowing where a community is can mean life or death when battling disease. Join us as Dr. Victoria M. Gammino walks us through her work turning geospatial data into the tools and technology needed to keep the world healthy and disease free.

Capturing Knowledge for Future Work

Capturing Knowledge for Future Work

Like life, our projects move fast, and it is hard to find the time to stop and look around, causing us to miss insights that could be valuable to future projects. That’s where the Knowledge Harvesting (KH) Framework comes in.

The ROAR Awards: Two Years and Counting

The ROAR Awards: Two Years and Counting

Charles Schmidt worked with his leadership in the Cyber Security Technical Center to figure out ways to incentivize better use of Tech Stature to record outreach activities. The Collaboration & Information Management department in Corporate Operations created the initial ROAR website to record awardees, and the Digital Content and Creative department designed the ROAR ribbons with their roaring lion icon. Thanks to these collective efforts, the Ribbons for Outreach Activity Recognition, or ROAR, was born.

Jen Choi and Josh LeFevre and the power of “Yes, And”

Jen Choi and Josh LeFevre and the power of “Yes, And”

Innovation, much like improv, isn’t easy, but it can be a powerful way to bring people into a conversation they might typically avoid or feel excluded from. In our latest discussion with the Innovation Toolkit Team, Jen and Josh walk us through the power improvisation can have to start these conversations and how they refined their unique approach.

Coming Back to Make a Difference, Find a Passion, and Change the World

Coming Back to Make a Difference, Find a Passion, and Change the World

In a mid-summer virtual lunch with student interns, MITRE President and CEO Dr. Jason Providakes said, “We’ve had all this bad news [this summer], but the fact that MITRE can continue an internship program is a testament to our commitment of building the future workforce and serving the public interest.”  A key part of MITRE’s overall student program this past summer, which involved nearly 500 student staff members, was the Emerging Technologies Summer Student Research Program, which began in 1989, and despite the pandemic, successfully completed its 32nd summer in 2020, under the leadership of Dr. James Ellenbogen.

Mentoring the Workforce of the Future: The Emerging Technologies Summer Student Program

Mentoring the Workforce of the Future: The Emerging Technologies Summer Student Program

The classic conception of an intern is a minion who brings people coffee, fixes printer jams, and does grunt work. The interns hired by MITRE’s Emerging Technologies Department, however, are not minions. They are student investigators charged with helping to solve overwhelming societal problems. Read profiles of four of these interns and their summer work in the public interest.

A Faint Silver Lining Emerges From 2020: A Couple of Lessons Learned About Change

A Faint Silver Lining Emerges From 2020: A Couple of Lessons Learned About Change

It’s no secret that change can be difficult and slow, especially when it comes to changes at work. Just this week, I heard an executive say, “Anyone who tells you that change is easy hasn’t done it before.”

Yet this year, many of us have quickly embraced virtual collaboration tools. We’ve all experienced numerous other changes, especially as we untethered from the “40 hour+ work on-site” culture. Why have we been so quick to adopt Zoom, Slack, and Office 365? What can we learn from this recent experience so that we can support our colleagues through future change?

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love (Certain) Public-Private Partnerships

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love (Certain) Public-Private Partnerships

In 2012, The Economist penned an obituary for the Public-Private Partnership (PPP). The headline: ‘RIPPP’. Eight years later however PPPs are very much alive and the appetite for them has not slowed in spite of high-profile scandals and debates about the commodification of public infrastructure.

PPPs, while diverse and increasingly complex, can most easily be thought of as a long-term contract between a public agency and a private party to execute or operate a project.

Getting Students Excited About STEM (and MITRE), with Willie Hill

Getting Students Excited About STEM (and MITRE), with Willie Hill

The STEM field has been described as the great equalizer, a field that celebrates and elevates those who contribute to it. Still, many students, especially students of color, find it intimidating and hard to approach. Fortunately, individuals like Willie Hill are dedicating their time and talents to show students of all backgrounds that STEM is fun and worth getting excited about.

Emotional Resilience in Professional Life

Emotional Resilience in Professional Life

Regular sources of stress in our lives can arise from challenges at work, challenges in personal life such as with partnership and parenting, and challenges from societal divisions at home and abroad, among many other factors. With one public crisis after another appearing in the news to add to what’s happening directly in our lives, these stress factors may pile on and conspire to make well-being hard to maintain.

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