My Path as a Techie to Learning About Equity

My Path as a Techie to Learning About Equity

Electrical Engineer, Jonathan Rotner, discusses the stories that stayed with him from his research for a website and paper called “AI Fails and How We Can Learn from Them”. He recalls a couple of stories where his first reaction was the AI fails were engineering problems that could be analyzed and fixed, when they were issues of Equity.

Safeguarding Our Smart Ports: Lessons from Djibouti with Tamara Ambrosio-Hemphill

Safeguarding Our Smart Ports: Lessons from Djibouti with Tamara Ambrosio-Hemphill

In this episode of the Knowledge-Driven Podcast, MITRE’s Tamara Ambrosio-Hemphill guides us through the decision-support tools MITRE has been developing to help the U.S. safeguard critical infrastructure across the globe while building partnerships and helping allies create a better future for their citizens.

New book teaches how to apply agility principles to organizations

New book teaches how to apply agility principles to organizations

In their new book, The Government Leader’s Guide to Organizational Agility, authors Sarah Miller and Dr. Shelley Kirkpatrick consolidated their combined 42 years of knowledge, tools, anecdotes, tips, and tricks into one resource for government agency leaders at all levels. Leaders are urged to consult the book as a reference when using agility to make organizational changes.

Uniting to Fight the Global Water Crisis

Uniting to Fight the Global Water Crisis

John Halamka, president of the Mayo Clinic Platform, and Doc Hendley, founder of Wine To Water, a nonprofit organization that helps communities around the world develop sustainable clean water solutions, spoke at a MITRE speaker series event this spring. They spoke about the challenges communities at home and abroad face accessing clean water. Read how this speaker series impacted Liv Blackmon, which led to over 50 employees signing up to help and donate to World Water Day.

Sustainable Diet, Sustainable World: Community Supported Agriculture Helps Make Both Happen

Sustainable Diet, Sustainable World: Community Supported Agriculture Helps Make Both Happen

When you buy your groceries, the best and brightest fruits and veggies have usually traveled across the country and sometimes across the world to get to you. This supply chain bypasses the perfectly fresh produce local to your community. Our traditional market practices have enormously high transportation and carbon costs, create massive amounts of wasted food, and may leave our local farmers with unsustainable businesses.

So what can we do to address these problems?

Energy Masters: Improving the Water and Energy Efficiency of Under-Invested Communities

Energy Masters: Improving the Water and Energy Efficiency of Under-Invested Communities

“Weatherizing my home? What does that mean?” “I’m only renting. Why should I care?” “That sounds complicated and expensive.”

These are common responses Kathy Huynh would hear from renters living in the lower-income apartment complexes where she spent time volunteering as an Energy Master. Energy Masters is a program focused on providing information and services for under-invested communities in Arlington and Alexandria. The objective is to help residents decrease their energy and water usage and utility bills, while, ideally, increasing comfort levels in units.

The Road to Resilient, Sustainable Infrastructure is a Smart One

The Road to Resilient, Sustainable Infrastructure is a Smart One

When Charles Clancy helped launch Virginia’s Smart City Innovation Competition in January, he mentioned that, despite being MITRE’s Chief Futurist, his job didn’t come with a crystal ball.

Instead, he told the hundred or so innovators participating in the month-long hackathon—the first of its kind in Virginia—that his job is to think beyond the challenges facing the government today, focus on likely challenges in the future, and ensure that MITRE has talent with the schooling and smarts to prepare for those problems.

Dr. David E. Willmes on Solving Global Food Insecurity

Dr. David E. Willmes on Solving Global Food Insecurity

Approximately 2 billion people lack regular access to sufficient quality food. The issue of global food insecurity is one that is constantly being looked at and, fortunately, MITRE is stepping up to help mitigate this problem. Dr. David E. Willmes discusses his team’s project and how it uses significant crop and consumption data to better understand the factors at play in this global problem.

The Power of Geospatial Data In Developing Countries

The Power of Geospatial Data In Developing Countries

Many countries in the Global South are not fortunate enough to have the infrastructure or tools that we take for granted. Things as simple as knowing where a community is can mean life or death when battling disease. Join us as Dr. Victoria M. Gammino walks us through her work turning geospatial data into the tools and technology needed to keep the world healthy and disease free.

The ROAR Awards: Two Years and Counting

The ROAR Awards: Two Years and Counting

Charles Schmidt worked with his leadership in the Cyber Security Technical Center to figure out ways to incentivize better use of Tech Stature to record outreach activities. The Collaboration & Information Management department in Corporate Operations created the initial ROAR website to record awardees, and the Digital Content and Creative department designed the ROAR ribbons with their roaring lion icon. Thanks to these collective efforts, the Ribbons for Outreach Activity Recognition, or ROAR, was born.

Will Quantum Computers Revolutionize My Daily Life? Not in the Ways You Might Think

Will Quantum Computers Revolutionize My Daily Life? Not in the Ways You Might Think

Quantum technologies frequently appear in popular science articles and can also be a popular speculative conversation topic among interested professionals. This is for good reason:  Quantum technologies have the potential to be game changing in many ways, but that fact can be misleading as to how soon, and how direct, those impacts will be to our everyday lives. As a trusted advisor to many government sponsors, MITRE explains these technologies and aims to temper expectations when necessary.

A Faint Silver Lining Emerges From 2020: A Couple of Lessons Learned About Change

A Faint Silver Lining Emerges From 2020: A Couple of Lessons Learned About Change

It’s no secret that change can be difficult and slow, especially when it comes to changes at work. Just this week, I heard an executive say, “Anyone who tells you that change is easy hasn’t done it before.”

Yet this year, many of us have quickly embraced virtual collaboration tools. We’ve all experienced numerous other changes, especially as we untethered from the “40 hour+ work on-site” culture. Why have we been so quick to adopt Zoom, Slack, and Office 365? What can we learn from this recent experience so that we can support our colleagues through future change?

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love (Certain) Public-Private Partnerships

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love (Certain) Public-Private Partnerships

In 2012, The Economist penned an obituary for the Public-Private Partnership (PPP). The headline: ‘RIPPP’. Eight years later however PPPs are very much alive and the appetite for them has not slowed in spite of high-profile scandals and debates about the commodification of public infrastructure.

PPPs, while diverse and increasingly complex, can most easily be thought of as a long-term contract between a public agency and a private party to execute or operate a project.

Artificial Intelligence Helps MITRE Save Lives During the Pandemic

Artificial Intelligence Helps MITRE Save Lives During the Pandemic

A computer scientist looks at a refugee crisis to model a pandemic.

How does that connection work exactly and why? If it appears to resemble a scenario in which a farmer learns how to plant an apple orchard by examining the supply chain for manufacturing orange juice, well, you may actually be onto something. The novel coronavirus has presented unprecedented medical, social, and economic challenges, which means that the thoughtful people responding have no choice but to innovate. However, in 2020, innovation doesn’t mean going where no one has gone before. It means harvesting everything that has come before in a disciplined way to see what might bear fruit.

Encouraging the Next Generation of Innovative Thinkers

Encouraging the Next Generation of Innovative Thinkers

In designing solutions to some of the most pressing, complex, entrenched problems facing the nation, MITRE employees know they have to get creative.

And, as a company working in the public interest, we want to be sure the next generation of engineers and business leaders can address similarly formidable challenges. We want them to get creative too.

That’s why we recently deepened our partnership with James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA by bringing MITRE into the classroom.

Getting Students Excited About STEM (and MITRE), with Willie Hill

Getting Students Excited About STEM (and MITRE), with Willie Hill

The STEM field has been described as the great equalizer, a field that celebrates and elevates those who contribute to it. Still, many students, especially students of color, find it intimidating and hard to approach. Fortunately, individuals like Willie Hill are dedicating their time and talents to show students of all backgrounds that STEM is fun and worth getting excited about.

The Rise of Citizen Science

The Rise of Citizen Science

“Science,” “collaboration,” and “serving the best interests of the wider community” are cherished values at MITRE, as is the concept of continuous learning. At MITRE, citizen science is thus a volunteer and civic activity, a hobby, a tool for research, a source of learning, a professional and social networking opportunity, and a means of giving back to the scientific community.

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