Big Data in Knowledge Management

Big Data in Knowledge Management

I believe that knowledge management as a discipline developed because technology enabled the deluge of data we began experiencing about 20 years ago. The ways that we used to organize and share our information were no longer adequate to the task and we needed something new. I’ve spent the last five or six years focusing on data, more specifically on helping organizations treat their data as a strategic asset that requires the same stewardship afforded any other valuable resource within the organization.

10 Years of SharePoint: Growth and Evolution of a Collaborative Platform

10 Years of SharePoint: Growth and Evolution of a Collaborative Platform

MITRE started using SharePoint with a small pilot in 2003 and now has a robust set of several thousand intranet and extranet sites based on SharePoint 2010. It is used as a content management platform, a collaborative team platform (for projects, organizations and CoPs), for work process capture and scheduling, employee engagement, and blogging. It has become critical to MITRE’s business processes, resulting in an evolution of its capabilities over the years.

Communicating the Value of IT Rollouts

Communicating the Value of IT Rollouts

Each of our IT service managers is responsible for operating their service, measuring its impact, managing its cost, and evolving the service over time. How the service evolves, or its “roadmap”, is based on changing user requirements, product evolution, technology changes, cost pressures, and industry trends. The service manager must stay informed and continuously question their assumptions as they develop their roadmaps. But almost as important as the ability to develop their roadmap is the need to communicate their roadmap.

Enterprise Social, Five Years in

Enterprise Social, Five Years in

In 2009, “social” was still a buzzword, Facebook was years away from an IPO, and Instagram has not been invented. Yet a groundswell was beginning – people used to the ease of sharing in their online social networks came to their offices, only to find that exchanging information was difficult at best. Communications flowed from the top of the organizational hierarchy down, flooding the already overflowing email inboxes – while cross-organizational collaboration was severely impeded.

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